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See all
1
Stage1
Costa dei Trabocchi ITT Fossacesia Marina — Ortona
2
Stage2
Teramo — San Salvo
3
Stage3
Vasto — Melfi
4
Stage4
Venosa — Lago Laceno
5
Stage5
Atripalda — Salerno
6
Stage6
Napoli — Napoli
7
Stage7
Capua — Gran Sasso d'Italia (Campo Imperatore)
8
Stage8
Terni — Fossombrone
9
Stage9
Savignano sul Rubicone — Cesena (Technogym Village)
10
Stage10
Scandiano — Viareggio
11
Stage11
Camaiore — Tortona
12
Stage12
Bra — Rivoli
13
Stage13
Borgofranco d’Ivrea — Crans Montana
14
Stage14
Sierre — Cassano Magnago
15
Stage15
Seregno — Bergamo
16
Stage16
Sabbio Chiese — Monte Bondone
17
Stage17
Pergine Valsugana — Caorle
18
Stage18
Oderzo — Val di Zoldo
19
Stage19
Longarone — Tre Cime di Lavaredo (Rif. Auronzo)
20
Stage20
Tarvisio — Monte Lussari
21
Stage21
Roma — Roma
Total km
3,469.2
Average km
165.2
Altitude gain (m)
51,400

The Route

Stage
Tope / Difficulty
Date
Start / Finish
Distance
1
Sat.
06/05
Costa dei Trabocchi ITT Fossacesia Marina - Ortona
19,6 km

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technical info

The ITT is raced almost entirely along the Ciclovia dei Trabocchi, a cycle path built from the former ‘Ferrovia Adriatica’ railway line. The route begins flat along the coast, with lovely sights of the trabocchi (traditional fishing huts), all the way to the port of Ortona. From here, the road rises for a little over one kilometre until the finish, downtown.

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2
Sun.
07/05
Teramo - San Salvo
201 km

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technical info

Rolling from the start, the route crosses the hinterland around Teramo, touching some popular cycling locations (the highlights of Tirreno-Adriatico), such as Colonnella, Tortoreto and Alba Adriatica. The route then follows the coast, heading inland at points to take in climbs to Silvi Paese, Chieti and Ripa Teatina. The route hits the coast again, heading for a sprint finish on the San Salvo Marina seafront.

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3
Mon.
08/05
Vasto - Melfi
216 km

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technical info

The stage is divided into two distinct parts. The course begins perfectly flat, following the Adriatic coast and the Foggia plains. As the stage enters Basilicata, the route crosses the Monte Vulture massif, touching the lakes of Monticchio, and then drops towards Rionero and Rapolla before taking in the final climb to Melfi.

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4
Tue.
09/05
Venosa - Lago Laceno
175 km

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technical info

This first stage across the Apennines takes in a series of climbs, totalling 3,500 metres of vertical elevation gain. It’s a constant succession of undulations, with no challenging ramps, but no pause for breath either. The climbs are lengthy, around 20 km, however not forbidding, with gradients ranging between 4-5%. The final ascent to Colle Molella features a challenging section of approximately 3 km with 10% gradients, topping out at 12%. The summit comes 4 km before the finish.

climb detail

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  • climb detail
5
Wed.
10/05
Atripalda - Salerno
171 km

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technical info

The flat finale of this stage will most likely be a sprinter’s thing. The route first crosses the Irpinia, touching many of the places that were affected by the 1980 earthquake, such as Sant’Angelo dei Lombardi. There will be some challenging ramps along the route, such as the Passo Serra just 13 kilometres into the race. The stage finale is downhill along the Tyrrhenian Sea, all the way to the finish line in Salerno.

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6
Thu.
11/05
Napoli - Napoli
162 km

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technical info

A short and intense stage across the regional capital and the Amalfi coast. Starting in Naples, the route passes north of the Vesuvius, crosses the Valico di Chiunzi and enters Amalfi, roughly taking a circuit of the entire Amalfi coast. The course is a succession of undulating, twisting roads all the way to Pompei. From here, it is straight all the way to the seafront in Naples, where the closing sprint along the Via Caracciolo seafront will likely be contended by a slender peloton.

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7
Fri.
12/05
Capua - Gran Sasso d'Italia (Campo Imperatore)
218 km

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technical info

This is a lengthy and rolling stage, with a long closing climb. Without taking into account the ITT in Ortona, this will be the second summit finish of the Giro. After a long approach, the route takes in climbs to Roccaraso and the Piano delle Cinque Miglia (where Girardengo had to give in, at a very different time and under very different circumstances), followed by a lengthy descent to the base of the Gran Sasso. The road to Campo Imperatore ascends endlessly for nearly 45 km, with a false-flat drag halfway through the climb. KOM points will be up for grabs in Calascio and at the finish. The Gran Sasso hosted four Giro stage finishes, but in 1985, the line was set in Fonte Cerreto, nearly 1,000 metres below. The most recent stage finish was in 2018, when victory went to Simon Yates.

climb detail

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  • technical info
  • climb detail
8
Sat.
13/05
Terni - Fossombrone
207 km

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technical info

This stage, too, is divided into two distinct parts. The route undulates with no major topographical impediments for the first 150 kilometres, through Spoleto, Foligno, Gualdo Tadino and Cagli, all the way to the Gola del Furlo. Almost the entire altitude gain of the stage is crammed in the last 60 km. The route climbs up the ‘salita dei Cappuccini’ (approx. 3 km with 19% maximum gradients) and the Monte delle Cesane (approx. 7 km with 18% maximum gradients), then kicks up to Montefelcino, before taking another pass on the ‘salita dei Cappuccini’. The summit, coming approximately 5 km before the finish, may serve as ‘springboard’ for anyone hoping to contend for stage victory.

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9
Sun.
14/05
Savignano sul Rubicone - Cesena (Technogym Village)
35,0 km

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technical info

A pan-flat ITT for time trialists, with long sections of straight roads connected by just a dozen curves. The stage runs throughout the centre of Cesena and finishes at the Technogym Village.

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10
Tue.
16/05
Scandiano - Viareggio
196 km

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technical info

This stage may be another possible sprint finish. However, as the first 100 kilometres are far from flat, the peloton shall make an effort to keep together. The route clears the Passo delle Radici, reaching Tuscany, after a rolling approach of over 80 km, with mild climbs alternating with downhill sections. After a lengthy descent to Castelnuovo Garfagnana, the route takes in one final kick up to Monteperpoli. The last 70 km are quite uncomplicated, leading all the way to the seafront in Viareggio for the closing sprint.

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11
Wed.
17/05
Camaiore - Tortona
219 km

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technical info

The stage is well suited to a bunch sprint, despite a few minor hillocks along the course. After crossing the province of La Spezia and reaching the Cinque Terre, the route passes north of Genoa along the Val Fontanabuona, all the way to the Colla di Boasi, still heading north. Next, the route passes Busalla, the Passo della Castagnola, Gavi and Serravalle Scrivia. The last 30 km are straight and slightly downhill all the way to the finish.

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12
Thu.
18/05
Bra - Rivoli
179 km

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technical info

The stage has a diverse route which includes flat, rolling and mountain roads. Starting in Bra, the course touches some of the most famous places of the area, such as La Morra, Montelupo Albese, Alba and Baldissero d’Alba. The route then runs across the Po Plain for nearly 60 km, passing over the finish line. Next comes a challenging ascent of the Colle Braida, near the Sacra di San Michele. The last 20 km undulate all the way to the finish in Rivoli.

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13
Fri.
19/05
Borgofranco d’Ivrea - Crans Montana
207 km

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technical info

This colossal stage – the second mountain finish of Giro – has all the traditional features of an Alpine setting. The approach is flat, however with mild uphill gradients, followed by a succession of lengthy climbs alternating with short, flat sections that are common in U-shaped valleys throughout the western Alps. The route takes in a lengthy (34 km), yet not forbidding climb up to the Colle del Gran San Bernardo (2469 m – Cima Coppi). Next comes an equally long descent, partly on the covered road along the tunnel. The route climbs up the Croix de Coeur (15 km with a 1350-m vertical gain), at an altitude of over 2000 metres, and then descends for more than 22 km. After a short flat section, the course negotiates the final climb up to Crans Montana, coming from a different side than the usual access road to the resort.

climb detail

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  • technical info
  • climb detail
14
Sat.
20/05
Sierre - Cassano Magnago
193 km

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technical info

This is a sprinters’ stage with just one hurdle at the beginning, the Passo del Sempione (2005 m). This could lead to different strategies and possible scenarios, like a successful breakaway with the peloton chasing on downhill and flat roads along the 140 remaining kilometres after the pass. The route exits Switzerland, and the last 100 km are on straight and fast roads. Some bends and undulations over the final 20 kilometres might make things somewhat harder for the teams in the approach to the closing sprint.

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  • technical info
15
Sun.
21/05
Seregno - Bergamo
195 km

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technical info

This will be an ‘urban’ mountain stage. Even if the climbs along the route alternate with quite uncomplicated sections, we should expect attacks aplenty along the ascents. A few kilometres after the start, the route tackles the punishing gradients of the Valcava and enters the Bergamo province. After a first pass through the city (not over the finish line), the course ascends in hairpins all the way to Selvino, drops into Bracca and Sedrina, and heads back to Bergamo, passing over the finish (after a kick up the Boccola). After clearing the Roncola (coming from Barlino), the route then heads for the finish in Bergamo (the same as many editions of the Giro di Lombardia).

climb detail

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  • technical info
  • climb detail
16
Tue.
23/05
Sabbio Chiese - Monte Bondone
203 km

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technical info

The second colossal stage of the Giro is played out at relatively low altitudes. Crammed with brutal ascents and manageable ramps, however, it features over 5000 metres of vertical gain. The first part of the stage runs along the western shore of Lake Garda, all the way to Riva del Garda (Trentino). Immediately after tackling the Passo di Santa Barbara (average 10% gradient), the route clears the Passo di Bordala. After dropping into Rovereto, the stage reaches Vallarsa (with KOM points up for grabs in Matassone) and then passes Serrada, heading for the Folgaria plateau. Next comes a technical descent to Calliano (Val d’Adige), followed by a single flat sector of approx. 10 km. The route then tackles the Monte Bondone from Aldeno, with changing slopes and maximum 15% gradients. The finish is located a little past Viote.

climb detail

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  • technical info
  • climb detail
17
Wed.
24/05
Pergine Valsugana - Caorle
195 km

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technical info

The route has a slight downhill gradient and features no topographical impediment whatsoever, so we should expect the second-to-last bunch sprint of the 2023 Giro. At first, the course undulates mildly along the Brenta valley, and then flattens out in Bassano del Grappa. After a long ride through the Venetian plain on wide and straight roads, the route hits the coast, touching some of the most popular beaches in Italy such as Jesolo Lido, Eraclea Mare and Porto Santa Margherita, all the way to the final sprint in Caorle.

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18
Thu.
25/05
Oderzo - Val di Zoldo
161 km

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technical info

A short but intense mountain stage, at a relatively low altitude. A few kilometres after the start, the route ascends the Cansiglio coming from Vittorio Veneto (Passo la Crosetta), as customary, then it reaches and crosses the Alpago region all the way to the Piave valley. Past Longarone and Pieve di Cadore (the hometown of the painter Titian), the route takes in consecutive climbs up to Forcella Cibiana, Forno and Coi. The latter is a first-ever pass; the road here rises at over 10% for nearly 4 km, with peaks topping out at 19%. The finish is 5 km from the summit, descending halfway, and then going up at manageable gradients all the way to Palafavera.

climb detail

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  • technical info
  • climb detail
19
Fri.
26/05
Longarone - Tre Cime di Lavaredo (Rif. Auronzo)
183 km

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technical info

A quintessential majestic stage across the Dolomites. The route approaches and crosses the Agordo area, which is home to major eyewear manufacturers. The entire elevation gain of the stage is crammed in the following 100 kilometres, in which the peloton will take in consecutive climbs, linked with no pause for breath. After hitting Arabba, the route tackles the Passo di Campolongo, immediately followed by the Passo Valparola and the “Holy Stairs” of the Dolomites, namely the Passo Giau (coming from Selva di Cadore, with an approximate average gradient of 10%), the Passo Tre Croci and the Tre Cime di Lavaredo, with maximum 18% grades.

climb detail

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  • technical info
  • climb detail
20
Sat.
27/05
Tarvisio - Monte Lussari
18,6 km

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technical info

A challenging individual time trial. The stage begins with (approximately) ten flat or slightly downhill kilometres, mostly along the Alpe Adria cycle route, building up speed. Split time is taken at the Saisera stream. The following 8 kilometres on concrete paved roads lead all the way to the sanctuary. The actual climb is 7.5-km long, with average 12% gradients, topping out at 15% over the first 4.8 kilometres (as in the middle section of the Zoncolan). The final part of the route is wavy, with a short kick up (max. 22% gradients) when entering the urban area. After a short descent, the road goes up again, all the way to the finish.

climb detail

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  • technical info
  • climb detail
21
Sun.
28/05
Roma - Roma
115 km

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technical info

The 106th Giro d’Italia hits the Italian capital for the grand finale. The stage will be a closing showcase featuring an 11.5-km circuit of the centre of Rome, to be repeated 10 times. The route will touch a number of historical landmarks such as the ‘Homeland Altar’, the Senate Palace, the Circus Maximus and the Baths of Caracalla, before the finish at the Imperial Fora, near the Colosseum.

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Stage 1 Sat. 06/05

Costa dei Trabocchi ITT Fossacesia Marina – Ortona

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technical info

The ITT is raced almost entirely along the Ciclovia dei Trabocchi, a cycle path built from the former ‘Ferrovia Adriatica’ railway line. The route begins flat along the coast, with lovely sights of the trabocchi (traditional fishing huts), all the way to the port of Ortona. From here, the road rises for a little over one kilometre until the finish, downtown.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage 2 Sun. 07/05

Teramo – San Salvo

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technical info

Rolling from the start, the route crosses the hinterland around Teramo, touching some popular cycling locations (the highlights of Tirreno-Adriatico), such as Colonnella, Tortoreto and Alba Adriatica. The route then follows the coast, heading inland at points to take in climbs to Silvi Paese, Chieti and Ripa Teatina. The route hits the coast again, heading for a sprint finish on the San Salvo Marina seafront.

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  • technical info
Stage 3 Mon. 08/05

Vasto – Melfi

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technical info

The stage is divided into two distinct parts. The course begins perfectly flat, following the Adriatic coast and the Foggia plains. As the stage enters Basilicata, the route crosses the Monte Vulture massif, touching the lakes of Monticchio, and then drops towards Rionero and Rapolla before taking in the final climb to Melfi.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage 4 Tue. 09/05

Venosa – Lago Laceno

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technical info

This first stage across the Apennines takes in a series of climbs, totalling 3,500 metres of vertical elevation gain. It’s a constant succession of undulations, with no challenging ramps, but no pause for breath either. The climbs are lengthy, around 20 km, however not forbidding, with gradients ranging between 4-5%. The final ascent to Colle Molella features a challenging section of approximately 3 km with 10% gradients, topping out at 12%. The summit comes 4 km before the finish.

climb detail

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
  • climb detail
Stage 5 Wed. 10/05

Atripalda – Salerno

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map

technical info

The flat finale of this stage will most likely be a sprinter’s thing. The route first crosses the Irpinia, touching many of the places that were affected by the 1980 earthquake, such as Sant’Angelo dei Lombardi. There will be some challenging ramps along the route, such as the Passo Serra just 13 kilometres into the race. The stage finale is downhill along the Tyrrhenian Sea, all the way to the finish line in Salerno.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage6 Thu. 11/05

Napoli – Napoli

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technical info

A short and intense stage across the regional capital and the Amalfi coast. Starting in Naples, the route passes north of the Vesuvius, crosses the Valico di Chiunzi and enters Amalfi, roughly taking a circuit of the entire Amalfi coast. The course is a succession of undulating, twisting roads all the way to Pompei. From here, it is straight all the way to the seafront in Naples, where the closing sprint along the Via Caracciolo seafront will likely be contended by a slender peloton.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage7 Fri. 12/05

Capua – Gran Sasso d'Italia (Campo Imperatore)

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technical info

This is a lengthy and rolling stage, with a long closing climb. Without taking into account the ITT in Ortona, this will be the second summit finish of the Giro. After a long approach, the route takes in climbs to Roccaraso and the Piano delle Cinque Miglia (where Girardengo had to give in, at a very different time and under very different circumstances), followed by a lengthy descent to the base of the Gran Sasso. The road to Campo Imperatore ascends endlessly for nearly 45 km, with a false-flat drag halfway through the climb. KOM points will be up for grabs in Calascio and at the finish. The Gran Sasso hosted four Giro stage finishes, but in 1985, the line was set in Fonte Cerreto, nearly 1,000 metres below. The most recent stage finish was in 2018, when victory went to Simon Yates.

climb detail

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
  • climb detail
Stage8 Sat. 13/05

Terni – Fossombrone

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technical info

This stage, too, is divided into two distinct parts. The route undulates with no major topographical impediments for the first 150 kilometres, through Spoleto, Foligno, Gualdo Tadino and Cagli, all the way to the Gola del Furlo. Almost the entire altitude gain of the stage is crammed in the last 60 km. The route climbs up the ‘salita dei Cappuccini’ (approx. 3 km with 19% maximum gradients) and the Monte delle Cesane (approx. 7 km with 18% maximum gradients), then kicks up to Montefelcino, before taking another pass on the ‘salita dei Cappuccini’. The summit, coming approximately 5 km before the finish, may serve as ‘springboard’ for anyone hoping to contend for stage victory.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage 9 Sun. 14/05

Savignano sul Rubicone – Cesena (Technogym Village)

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technical info

A pan-flat ITT for time trialists, with long sections of straight roads connected by just a dozen curves. The stage runs throughout the centre of Cesena and finishes at the Technogym Village.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage 10 Tue. 16/05

Scandiano – Viareggio

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technical info

This stage may be another possible sprint finish. However, as the first 100 kilometres are far from flat, the peloton shall make an effort to keep together. The route clears the Passo delle Radici, reaching Tuscany, after a rolling approach of over 80 km, with mild climbs alternating with downhill sections. After a lengthy descent to Castelnuovo Garfagnana, the route takes in one final kick up to Monteperpoli. The last 70 km are quite uncomplicated, leading all the way to the seafront in Viareggio for the closing sprint.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage 11 Wed. 17/05

Camaiore – Tortona

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technical info

The stage is well suited to a bunch sprint, despite a few minor hillocks along the course. After crossing the province of La Spezia and reaching the Cinque Terre, the route passes north of Genoa along the Val Fontanabuona, all the way to the Colla di Boasi, still heading north. Next, the route passes Busalla, the Passo della Castagnola, Gavi and Serravalle Scrivia. The last 30 km are straight and slightly downhill all the way to the finish.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage 12 Thu. 18/05

Bra – Rivoli

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map

technical info

The stage has a diverse route which includes flat, rolling and mountain roads. Starting in Bra, the course touches some of the most famous places of the area, such as La Morra, Montelupo Albese, Alba and Baldissero d’Alba. The route then runs across the Po Plain for nearly 60 km, passing over the finish line. Next comes a challenging ascent of the Colle Braida, near the Sacra di San Michele. The last 20 km undulate all the way to the finish in Rivoli.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage 13 Fri. 19/05

Borgofranco d’Ivrea – Crans Montana

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map

technical info

This colossal stage – the second mountain finish of Giro – has all the traditional features of an Alpine setting. The approach is flat, however with mild uphill gradients, followed by a succession of lengthy climbs alternating with short, flat sections that are common in U-shaped valleys throughout the western Alps. The route takes in a lengthy (34 km), yet not forbidding climb up to the Colle del Gran San Bernardo (2469 m – Cima Coppi). Next comes an equally long descent, partly on the covered road along the tunnel. The route climbs up the Croix de Coeur (15 km with a 1350-m vertical gain), at an altitude of over 2000 metres, and then descends for more than 22 km. After a short flat section, the course negotiates the final climb up to Crans Montana, coming from a different side than the usual access road to the resort.

climb detail

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
  • climb detail
Stage 14 Sat. 20/05

Sierre – Cassano Magnago

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map

technical info

This is a sprinters’ stage with just one hurdle at the beginning, the Passo del Sempione (2005 m). This could lead to different strategies and possible scenarios, like a successful breakaway with the peloton chasing on downhill and flat roads along the 140 remaining kilometres after the pass. The route exits Switzerland, and the last 100 km are on straight and fast roads. Some bends and undulations over the final 20 kilometres might make things somewhat harder for the teams in the approach to the closing sprint.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage 15 Sun. 21/05

Seregno – Bergamo

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map

technical info

This will be an ‘urban’ mountain stage. Even if the climbs along the route alternate with quite uncomplicated sections, we should expect attacks aplenty along the ascents. A few kilometres after the start, the route tackles the punishing gradients of the Valcava and enters the Bergamo province. After a first pass through the city (not over the finish line), the course ascends in hairpins all the way to Selvino, drops into Bracca and Sedrina, and heads back to Bergamo, passing over the finish (after a kick up the Boccola). After clearing the Roncola (coming from Barlino), the route then heads for the finish in Bergamo (the same as many editions of the Giro di Lombardia).

climb detail

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
  • climb detail
Stage 16 Tue. 23/05

Sabbio Chiese – Monte Bondone

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map

technical info

The second colossal stage of the Giro is played out at relatively low altitudes. Crammed with brutal ascents and manageable ramps, however, it features over 5000 metres of vertical gain. The first part of the stage runs along the western shore of Lake Garda, all the way to Riva del Garda (Trentino). Immediately after tackling the Passo di Santa Barbara (average 10% gradient), the route clears the Passo di Bordala. After dropping into Rovereto, the stage reaches Vallarsa (with KOM points up for grabs in Matassone) and then passes Serrada, heading for the Folgaria plateau. Next comes a technical descent to Calliano (Val d’Adige), followed by a single flat sector of approx. 10 km. The route then tackles the Monte Bondone from Aldeno, with changing slopes and maximum 15% gradients. The finish is located a little past Viote.

climb detail

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
  • climb detail
Stage 17 Wed. 24/05

Pergine Valsugana – Caorle

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map

technical info

The route has a slight downhill gradient and features no topographical impediment whatsoever, so we should expect the second-to-last bunch sprint of the 2023 Giro. At first, the course undulates mildly along the Brenta valley, and then flattens out in Bassano del Grappa. After a long ride through the Venetian plain on wide and straight roads, the route hits the coast, touching some of the most popular beaches in Italy such as Jesolo Lido, Eraclea Mare and Porto Santa Margherita, all the way to the final sprint in Caorle.

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
Stage 18 Thu. 25/05

Oderzo – Val di Zoldo

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map

technical info

A short but intense mountain stage, at a relatively low altitude. A few kilometres after the start, the route ascends the Cansiglio coming from Vittorio Veneto (Passo la Crosetta), as customary, then it reaches and crosses the Alpago region all the way to the Piave valley. Past Longarone and Pieve di Cadore (the hometown of the painter Titian), the route takes in consecutive climbs up to Forcella Cibiana, Forno and Coi. The latter is a first-ever pass; the road here rises at over 10% for nearly 4 km, with peaks topping out at 19%. The finish is 5 km from the summit, descending halfway, and then going up at manageable gradients all the way to Palafavera.

climb detail

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
  • climb detail
Stage 19 Fri. 26/05

Longarone – Tre Cime di Lavaredo (Rif. Auronzo)

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map

technical info

A quintessential majestic stage across the Dolomites. The route approaches and crosses the Agordo area, which is home to major eyewear manufacturers. The entire elevation gain of the stage is crammed in the following 100 kilometres, in which the peloton will take in consecutive climbs, linked with no pause for breath. After hitting Arabba, the route tackles the Passo di Campolongo, immediately followed by the Passo Valparola and the “Holy Stairs” of the Dolomites, namely the Passo Giau (coming from Selva di Cadore, with an approximate average gradient of 10%), the Passo Tre Croci and the Tre Cime di Lavaredo, with maximum 18% grades.

climb detail

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
  • climb detail
Stage 20 Sat. 27/05

Tarvisio – Monte Lussari

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map

technical info

A challenging individual time trial. The stage begins with (approximately) ten flat or slightly downhill kilometres, mostly along the Alpe Adria cycle route, building up speed. Split time is taken at the Saisera stream. The following 8 kilometres on concrete paved roads lead all the way to the sanctuary. The actual climb is 7.5-km long, with average 12% gradients, topping out at 15% over the first 4.8 kilometres (as in the middle section of the Zoncolan). The final part of the route is wavy, with a short kick up (max. 22% gradients) when entering the urban area. After a short descent, the road goes up again, all the way to the finish.

climb detail

  • profile
  • map
  • technical info
  • climb detail
Stage 21 Sun. 28/05

Roma – Roma

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The 106th Giro d’Italia hits the Italian capital for the grand finale. The stage will be a closing showcase featuring an 11.5-km circuit of the centre of Rome, to be repeated 10 times. The route will touch a number of historical landmarks such as the ‘Homeland Altar’, the Senate Palace, the Circus Maximus and the Baths of Caracalla, before the finish at the Imperial Fora, near the Colosseum.

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